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6th Grade Art Overview

Page history last edited by klysne@woodlawnschool.org 7 years, 11 months ago

 

Sixth Grade Art

 

Instructor: Kimberly Lysne

 

Curriculum MapClass Page

 

What does it mean to be part of a society? The visual characteristics of a work of art are often influenced by the society in which it was created. In art class, students examine this question and are asked to consider the visual arts in relation to European history and societies. Students learn to “read” the story of art in order to reveal more about people, places, and events.  They demonstrate an understanding of the influence of art history by creating works of art that are influenced by specific styles, discovering the advantages and limitations of a variety of media. They communicate meaning in their work using subjects, themes, and symbols from their own lives. Students also spend time in nature as they work toward developing a personal relationship to the land.  They use art to develop a sense of place and community within the natural environment, and use their creative problem solving skills to address social and environmental issues.  

 

 

Throughout the year, students practice the Studio Habits of Mind: develop craft, engage and persist, observe, understand art world, stretch and explore, envision, express, and reflect.  Trips to local museums and galleries provide students the opportunity to analyze and interpret a variety of artworks. 

 

 

Guiding questions:

  • What information can an artwork reveal about a society?
  • How can artwork be used to influence and possibly change a society?
  • What gives value to a work of art?

 

 

 

 

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