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English Language and Composition Overview

Page history last edited by Kyle Tilley 8 years, 5 months ago

AP English Language and Composition

 

Instructor: Kyle Tilley

Curriculum Map , Class Page

 

Course Overview

This course is designed to engage students in a beginning study of a college-level composition course as per the guidelines prescribed the College Board for an Advanced Placement course. Students will be asked to read closely, discuss openly, and write thoughtfully each day, and will be expected to work to develop continued sophistication in all of these areas, with special attention to developing a broader and deeper understanding of rhetoric and how language works.  Students will hone their ability to work with language with a greater awareness of purpose and strategy.  Course readings feature a wide range of works: expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative, from a wide variety of authors, historical contexts, and subjects.

 

Students will be expected to write often, with an emphasis on expository, analytical, and argumentative writing that forms the basis of academic and professional communication. The writing assignments should help students gain textual power, making them more alert to an author’s purpose, the needs of an audience, the demands of the subject, and the resources of language: syntax, word choice, and tone.

 

Students will prepare for the AP English Language and Composition Exam, and may be granted advanced placement, college credit, or both as a result of satisfactory performance.

 

Supplemental literature of this course will focus primarily on European literature from the 18th century to the present.

 

 

Texts

Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (summer)

Sophie’s World, Jostein Gaarder (summer)

The Turn of the Screw, Henry James

MacBeth, William Shakespeare

Gulliver’s Travels, Jonathan Swift

The Grand Inquisitor, Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Heartbreak House, George Bernard Shaw

1984, George Orwell

Everything’s an Argument (5th Edition), ed. Andrea Lunsford **

Rhetorical Devices: A Handbook and Activities for Student Writers, ed. Paul Moliken **

Assorted supplementary materials

 

** These will function as course textbooks; they are recommended by the College Board for use in the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition course.

 

 

 

 

 

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